HOME ABOUT CONTACT AVAILABLE ISSUES SUBSCRIBE MEDIA & ADS
LATEST UPDATES » Vol 22, No 11, November 2018 – The Asian Cancer - War on liver cancer       » 2018 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine winners       » Women more prone to selected chemotherapy side effects       » Tibetan fungus could help fight liver cancer       » Standards for TCM decoction to be applied globally       » RMB200 million donation to build Tsinghua University Biomedical Sciences Building      
EYE ON CHINA
Chinese researchers use bacteria to remove toxic chemicals from water
E. coli found to remove toxic mercury ions and selenite from water

Escherichia coli, commonly known as E. coli, a bacteria that can cause severe food poisoning, diarrhea, and septicemia, could be useful in removing toxic chemicals from water, according to a new study by Chinese researchers.

Researchers from Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography under the Chinese Academy of Sciences found the bacteria could remove toxic mercury ions and selenite from water.

Mercury contamination is a global concern because of its high toxicity, persistence, and wide distribution in the environment. Mercury in water is mainly in the form of divalent mercury ion, which can be easily converted into highly toxic methyl mercury by organisms. Eating seafood contaminated with mercury can damage the central nervous system and is particularly dangerous for pregnant and nursing women and young children.

Selenium is a necessary and beneficial element for humans, but the gap between selenium deficiency and excess is very small. Selenite, a compound that contains selenium ion in water, is a common pollutant.

In some areas, the mercury and selenium levels in the Earth's crust and water are very high, and the mining of mercury and selenium contaminates surrounding areas.

Researchers put E. coli in water and found that with a divalent mercury ion concentration of 40 micrograms per liter, about 93.2 percent of the toxic chemical was removed. Of the total mercury removed, about 3.3 percent was adsorbed on the bacterial surface, 2 percent accumulated inside the bacteria, and 80.6 percent converted in the form of nontoxic chemical compound.

Meanwhile, E. coli also reduced selenite to harmless precipitates in the water.

The research, published in the Science of the Total Environment, indicated that the bacteria would have great application prospects in removing mercury and selenium contamination. (Xinhua)

Click here for the complete issue.

NEWS CRUNCH  
news Asia is the fastest growing region for nutraceuticals
news 2018 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine winners
news Vitafoods Asia expands by 40 per cent in 2018
PR NEWSWIRE  
Asia Pacific Biotech News
EDITORS' CHOICE  
COLUMNS  

APBN Editorial Calendar 2018
January:
Obesity / Outlook for 2018
February:
Searching for the fountain of youth
March:
Women in Science - Making a difference
April:
Digestive health in the 21st century - Trust your guts
May:
Dental health - The root to good health
June:
Cancer - Therapies and strategies for better patient outcomes
July:
Water management - Technologies for biotech and pharmaceutical industries
August:
Regenerative technology - Meat of the future
September:
Doctor Robot - The digital healthcare revolution
October:
Bones / Breast cancer
November:
Liver health / Top science research nations & institutions
December:
AIDS / Breakthrough of the year/Emerging trends
Editorial calendar is subjected to changes.
MAGAZINE TAGS
About Us
Events
Available issues
Editorial Board
Letters to Editor
Instructions to Authors
Advertise with Us
CONTACT
World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd.
5 Toh Tuck Link, Singapore 596224
Tel: 65-6466-5775
Fax: 65-6467-7667
» For Editorial Enquiries:
   biotech_edit@wspc.com or Ms Lim Guan Yu
» For Subscriptions, Advertisements &
   Media Partnerships Enquiries:
   biotech_ad@wspc.com
Copyright© 2018 World Scientific Publishing Co Pte Ltd  •  Privacy Policy