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EYE ON CHINA
Why sunshine improves mood and makes us smarter
Moderate exposure to ultraviolet light in mice enhances perception and learning

China is planning to update the regulation of its top science awards by lifting the restriction on the nationality of winners.

Science has already proved that sunny days can lead to sunny dispositions, helping improve a person's mood, intelligence and memory鈥攁nd researchers in East China have now shed light on why.

A team at the University of Science and Technology of China in Hefei, Anhui province, discovered that ultraviolet (UV) light鈥攁n element of sunshine鈥攁ctivates a change in the brain that can make us smarter.

Tests on mice showed that moderate exposure to UV light enhances perception and learning, according to Xiong Wei, a professor at the university's School of Life Sciences who co-led the study.

Mice were exposed to 50 millijoules per square centimeter of UV, he said, which is equal to 20 to 30 minutes of ambient midday sun in Florida in summer.

The mice that received the light needed just four rounds of training to complete a rotarod test, a standard tool used to evaluate the motor skills of a rodent. Those not exposed to UV required six rounds of training to complete the same test.

Using single-cell mass spectrometry, an extremely sensitive and specific analytical technique, scientists found that a metabolic pathway in the brain was involved.

Exposure to UV increases blood urocanic acid, which is largely found in the skin and acts as a natural sunscreen. However, tests showed that the acid also reacts with brain cells to boost levels of glutamate, a neurotransmitter involved in cognitive functions such as learning and memory.

Xiong said previous research had found that urocanic acid was converted to glutamate in the liver, but this is the first time it has been demonstrated that the synthesis process can happen in the brain鈥攁 finding that surprised the team.

"Our research originated from an unexpected finding about three years ago, when we were researching small molecules in nerve cells," Xiong said. "We detected urocanic acid in nerve cells in the brain. This substance is found predominantly in the outermost layer of the skin, and in sweat and urine. So we wanted to know where the acid in the brain comes from and what role it plays."

The team's ultimate goal is to work on molecule-related mechanisms of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease.

"To diagnose the diseases in their early stages, which has been very hard, we wanted to find some small molecules that could serve as biomarkers," Xiong said.

He said the research team also includes chemists and materials scientists. The team's findings were published in Cell. (China Daily)

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PR NEWSWIRE  
Asia Pacific Biotech News
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APBN Editorial Calendar 2018
January:
Obesity / Outlook for 2018
February:
Searching for the fountain of youth
March:
Women in Science - Making a difference
April:
Digestive health in the 21st century - Trust your guts
May:
Dental health - The root to good health
June:
Cancer - Therapies and strategies for better patient outcomes
July:
Water management - Technologies for biotech and pharmaceutical industries
August:
Regenerative technology - Meat of the future
September:
Doctor Robot - The digital healthcare revolution
October:
Bones / Breast cancer
November:
Liver health / Top science research nations & institutions
December:
AIDS / Breakthrough of the year/Emerging trends
Editorial calendar is subjected to changes.
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