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LATEST UPDATES » Vol 22, No 12, December 2018 – The story of WeDoctor - The medical service system for tomorrow       » World's first unmanned clinic in China       » International outcry over world's first gene-edited babies born in China       » More HIV-positive foreigners enter China       » Pain-free childbirth to be promoted in China       » The past, present and future of life science      
BIOBOARD - ASIA-PACIFIC
Tetris-like program could speed breast cancer detection
Using artificial intelligence to locate lesions

Researchers from the University of Adelaide’s Australian Institute for Machine Learning (AIML) are developing a fully-automated medical image analysis program to detect breast tumours. The program uses a unique style to focus on the affected area.

In conjunction with an MRI scan, this autonomous program, using artificial intelligence, employs the traversal movement and style of a retro video game to examine the breast area.

University of Adelaide PhD candidate Gabriel Maicas Suso and Associate Professor Gustavo Carneiro from AIML developed the program.

“Just as vintage video game Tetris manipulated geometric shapes to fit a space, this program uses a green square to navigate and search over the breast image to locate lesions. The square changes to red in colour if a lesion is detected,” says Mr Maicas.Suso.

“Our research shows that this unique approach is 1.78 times faster in finding a lesion than existing methods of detecting breast cancer, and the results are just as accurate,” he says.

The researchers created this program by applying deep reinforcement learning methods, a form of artificial intelligence (AI) that enables computers and machines to learn how to do complex tasks without being programmed by humans. As a result, the program can independently analyse breast tissue.

They were able to train the computer program with a relatively small amount of data, which is a critical challenge in medical imaging.

“By incorporating machine learning into medical imaging analysis, we have developed a program that intuitively locates lesions quickly and accurately,” says Associate Professor Carneiro.

“More research is needed before the program could be used clinically. Our ultimate aim is for this detection method to be used by radiologists to complement, support and assist their important work in making a precise and quick prognosis."

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NEWS CRUNCH  
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PR NEWSWIRE  
Asia Pacific Biotech News
EDITORS' CHOICE  
COLUMNS  

APBN Editorial Calendar 2018
January:
Obesity / Outlook for 2018
February:
Searching for the fountain of youth
March:
Women in Science - Making a difference
April:
Digestive health in the 21st century - Trust your guts
May:
Dental health - The root to good health
June:
Cancer - Therapies and strategies for better patient outcomes
July:
Water management - Technologies for biotech and pharmaceutical industries
August:
Regenerative technology - Meat of the future
September:
Doctor Robot - The digital healthcare revolution
October:
Bones / Breast cancer
November:
Liver health / Top science research nations & institutions
December:
AIDS / Breakthrough of the year/Emerging trends
Editorial calendar is subjected to changes.
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