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LATEST UPDATES » Vol 23, No 08, August 2019 – Digitalization vs Digitization — Exploring Emerging Trends in Healthcare       » Shanghai neurologists test brain implant to tackle drug addiction       » Gene-editing researchers reduce cancer risk       » Artificial Intelligence in Precision Cancer Diagnostics: Myth or Magic?       » Healing with Technology       » Smart Hospital: An Instrument of Care       » Transforming Healthcare with Data and Artificial Intelligence      
EYE ON CHINA
Your eyes don't deceive you, your brain does
Better understand how “visual information” is transmitted and processed by the brain

What you think you see is often not reality, and scientists in Shanghai have revealed that it is your brain, not your eyes, that tricks you.

Scientists from the Institute of Neuroscience of Chinese Academy of Sciences in Shanghai have peered inside our brains to understand the underlying mechanisms.

What we see through our eyes, including lines, patterns and colours, is transmitted back to the visual cortex, which is the brain’s “image processing center” and the most important gateway to cognition, language and other high-level functions.

Visual illusions occur when our brains try to make assumptions about something unknown or rarely seen in the natural world.

The Pinna illusion offers an example of how our brains fool us. When people stay focused on the dot in the center of a Pinna figure and move their head toward or away from the image, they will see the two concentric rings start to rotate. The inner circle will rotate clockwise and the outer one counter-clockwise, depending on the layout of the micro-patterns within the inner and outer rings.

But in reality, you are looking at two stationary rings in a still picture.

The medial superior temporal area (MST) of our brain represents the illusory motions as if they were real, it was revealed in a research article published in Neuroscience.

Neurons in the MST area of the visual cortex can be activated not only when we perceive real motion, but also when we “imagine” illusory motion as well, according to researcher Wang Wei.

The findings may help to understand how “visual information” is transmitted and processed by the brain.

Source: shine.cn

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PR NEWSWIRE  
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EDITORS' CHOICE  
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LIFE OF A SCIENTIST  

APBN Editorial Calendar 2019
January:
Taiwan Medical tourism
February:
Marijuana as medicine — Legal marijuana will open up scientific research
March:
Driven by curiosity
April:
Career developments for researchers
May:
What's cracking — Antibodies in ostrich eggs
June:
Clinical trials — What's in a name?
July:
Traditional Chinese medicine in modern healthcare — Integrating both worlds
Editorial calendar is subjected to changes.
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