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EYE ON CHINA
Nanogenerator for cancer drug delivery system
Electricity provides controlled release of chemotherapy drug

Chemotherapeutics is the most basic and frequently used approach for cancer treatment. However, chemotherapy drugs also have an adverse influence on normal cells, resulting in severe side effects.

Designing a drug delivery system featuring a controlled release of the drug for cancer therapy has thus become a hot research area. For instance, anti-tumour drugs can be loaded into biological drug carriers such as red blood cells. The red blood cells carrying the drugs will accumulate at the tumour sites and slowly release the drugs.

Scientists from the Beijing Institute of Nanoenergy and Nanosystems and Institute of Process Engineering under the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have developed a triboelectric nanogenerator that can act as an electricity supplier for the drug delivery system.

Electricity has been demonstrated to increase the response of the red blood cells which can be employed to control the drug release. However, it is challenging to deliver electricity to the tumours deep inside the body, because traditional electricity power suppliers have huge volumes.

The triboelectric nanogenerator is 2.5 centimeters long, 2.5 centimeters wide and 0.5 centimeters high. It can be implanted underneath the skin and can generate enough electricity to control the release of the drug.

Tests on mice with tumours showed the nanogenerator-controlled drug delivery system helps release drugs at the tumour sites and reduces the amount of drugs reaching the normal cells. It has significantly prolonged the survival life of mice and had less toxic side effects.

According to one of the researchers Feng Hongqing, the controlled drug release system can be applied as a wearable or implantable medical device to effectively kill tumours with fewer side effects in the future.

"We are also trying to further reduce the size of the triboelectric nanogenerator to comply with the implantation requirements," Feng said.

The research was published in Advanced Functional Materials.

Source: Xinhua

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APBN Editorial Calendar 2019
January:
Taiwan Medical tourism
February:
Marijuana as medicine — Legal marijuana will open up scientific research
March:
Driven by curiosity
Editorial calendar is subjected to changes.
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