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BIOBOARD: ASIA-PACIFIC
New technique shows promise for heart muscle regeneration
Duke-NUS scientists demonstrated a novel technique using a heart muscle associated protein that reliably turns stem cells into heart-healing muscle fibres

A study published in Anaesthesia raised important questions about the way anaemia is currently managed in surgical patients.

Professor Jeffery Hamdorf, Winthrop Professor of Surgical Education at The University of Western Australia and Chairman of the Western Australia Patient Blood Management Group, commented "This study will change the way people think about transfusion and haemoglobin levels."

Anaemia (lower than normal levels of haemoglobin in the blood) is associated with adverse patient outcomes. Transfusion has been the traditional treatment for moderate to severe anaemia, with the patient's haemoglobin level being the primary consideration in the decision to transfuse.

Questions, though, have been raised within the medical community in recent years about the effectiveness of transfusion.

Researchers from The University of Western Australia looked at over 60,000 patients undergoing surgery to determine if there is a level of anaemia where transfusion is effective. After adjusting for patient risk factors, they found that transfusion did not reduce the risk of death at any level of anaemia and was associated with longer hospital stays.

Improved management of patients' anaemia has become an important focus in the global uptake of patient blood management (PBM) programs.

The current study highlights the urgent need for a greater focus on preventing the development of anaemia and, when it does develop, exploring more appropriate methods of managing it.

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APBN Editorial Calendar 2019
January:
Taiwan Medical tourism
February:
Marijuana as medicine — Legal marijuana will open up scientific research
March:
Driven by curiosity
April:
Career developments for researchers
May:
What's cracking — Antibodies in ostrich eggs
June:
Clinical trials — What's in a name?
July:
Traditional Chinese medicine in modern healthcare — Integrating both worlds
August:
Digitalization vs Digitization — Exploring Emerging Trends in Healthcare
September:
Healthy Ageing — How Science is chipping in
October:
Disruptive Urban Farming — Microbes, Plasmids, and Recycling
November:
Evaluating cost effectiveness of genomic profiling
December:
Precision Medicine for Brain Tumours
Editorial calendar is subjected to changes.
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