HOME ABOUT CONTACT AVAILABLE ISSUES SUBSCRIBE MEDIA & ADS
LATEST UPDATES » Vol 23, No 09, September 2019 – Healthy Ageing — How Science is chipping in       » Officials in China make progress in development of new drugs       » The Science of Healthy Ageing       » Thailand Medtech landscape - Customer to Innovator       » China-Thailand Joint Research Institute on Medicine Launched in Bangkok      
BIOBOARD - ASIA-PACIFIC
Alteration of intrinsic properties of non-magnetized metals using light
Assistant Professor Justin Song from NTU’s School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences and Associate Professor Mark Rudner form Niels Bohr Institute published in Nature Physics a method that in principle could turn non-ferrous metals into magnets using laser light.

The properties of many materials are conventionally thought to be fixed, determined by the arrangement of its atoms at the nanoscale. For example, the configuration of atoms in a material dictates whether it conducts electricity easily or has non-conductive behaviour.

Song and Rudner wanted to explore how plasmons - local oscillations of charge in metals – and the intense oscillating electric fields they create, can be used to alter material properties.

Like how light consists of photons, the plasma oscillation consists of plasmons, a type of quasiparticle. Plasmons tend to oscillate and move in the same direction as the field that is driving it.

However, the scientists found that when the light irradiation is strong enough, the plasmons in a non-magnetic metallic disk can spontaneously rotate in either a left-handed or right-handed fashion, even when driven by linearly polarised light.

“This was a signature that the material’s intrinsic properties had been altered,” said Asst Prof Song. “We found that when a plasmon’s strong internal fields modify a material’s electronic band structure it would also transform the plasmon as well, setting up a feedback loop enabling the plasmon to spontaneously exhibit a chirality.”

This chiral motion of the plasmon produced a magnetisation which then made the non-magnetic metallic disk of their scheme, magnetic.

The scientists say that the key observation in their theoretical analysis is that intense plasmonic oscillating electric fields can modify the dynamics of the electrons in the metal.

Assoc Prof Rudner said: “From the point of view of an electron within a material, an electric field is an electric field: it doesn’t matter whether this oscillating field was produced from plasmons within the material itself or by a laser shining on the material.”

Song and Rudner used this insight to theoretically demonstrate the conditions when feedback from the internal fields of the plasmons could trigger an instability towards spontaneous magnetisation in the system. The team expects that this theoretical approach could be realised in a range of high quality plasmonic materials such as graphene.

Reference:

Mark S. Rudner & Justin C. W. Song (2019) Self-induced Berry flux and spontaneous non-equilibrium magnetism. Nature Physics

 

Click here for the complete issue.

NEWS CRUNCH  
news New computational fluid dynamics solution for modeling aerosol mixtures in biomedical and environmental research
news Medial Fair Thailand opened on 11th September 2019 with a focus on future-proofing Thailand's healthcare industry to meet the challenges and opportunities of the next decade
news Biofuel Producers and Users to Convene in Singapore for Global Biofuels Summit
news Philip Morris International opens artificial intelligence competition to develop improved strategies for medical diagnosis
PR NEWSWIRE  
Asia Pacific Biotech News
EDITORS' CHOICE  
SPOTLIGHT  
LIFE OF A SCIENTIST  

APBN Editorial Calendar 2019
January:
Taiwan Medical tourism
February:
Marijuana as medicine — Legal marijuana will open up scientific research
March:
Driven by curiosity
April:
Career developments for researchers
May:
What's cracking — Antibodies in ostrich eggs
June:
Clinical trials — What's in a name?
July:
Traditional Chinese medicine in modern healthcare — Integrating both worlds
August:
Digitalization vs Digitization — Exploring Emerging Trends in Healthcare
September:
Healthy Ageing — How Science is chipping in
Editorial calendar is subjected to changes.
MAGAZINE TAGS
About Us
Events
Available issues
Editorial Board
Letters to Editor
Instructions to Authors
Advertise with Us
CONTACT
World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd.
5 Toh Tuck Link, Singapore 596224
Tel: 65-6466-5775
Fax: 65-6467-7667
» For Editorial Enquiries:
   biotech_edit@wspc.com or Ms Deborah Seah
» For Subscriptions, Advertisements &
   Media Partnerships Enquiries:
   biotech_ad@wspc.com
Copyright© 2019 World Scientific Publishing Co Pte Ltd  •  Privacy Policy